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#323 - 01/04/08 09:19 PM Qing chestnut
lizak6 Offline
Member

Registered: 01/28/07
Posts: 9
Loc: huntington,n.y,usa
Is there anyone with experience with this cultivator?

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#324 - 01/10/08 01:53 PM Re: Qing chestnut
Ken Hunt Offline
Member

Registered: 12/10/01
Posts: 59
Loc: Columbia, MO, Boone
I have experience with the Qing cultivar in the central Missouri area. Overall it is a good cultivar but like all cultivars not perfect.
It is pure Chinese and has on average 15-16 gram nuts. I have seen nut crops on Qing that averaged 20 grams and in other years nuts that weighted 11 grams on average. My opinion is that Qing needs good care to produce large nuts - good soil and supplimental drip irrigation, herbicide strip - overall good culture. Qing can produce heavily some years, with the most I've seen so far of 104 pounds on a 10 year old tree. I like the limb structure of Qing, nice branch angles that produce strong crotches. Qing is not a fast growing tree and doesn't get all that large, which I think is good in an orchard setting. The nuts of Qing are extra shiny and are of excellent quality and keep above average. The major flaw with Qing is a much above percent of delayed graft failures. Anywhere from 25 to 40 percent over time. I did have a set of five Qing trees that all five trees are fine after 7-8 years. But in other cases nearly half of the grafted Qings had failed after around 5 years. So, for some folks that would be too much trouble. For others including me that enjoy grafting it is an inconvenience but not a big enough problem to not attempt growing Qing in that once you get a successful Qing grafted it is worth while. Though it does need good cultural care to bear good sized nuts. If you are planning to buy and already grafted small Qing tree, obtain the tree in the spring so that you have all summer to get it established before the first winter. Fall planted grafted chestnuts in Missouri can be a risk. I lost 25% of a bunch of fall planted Qings this past winter, mainly due to the freakess Easter Weekend Freeze - 16 degrees on April 4th after around 16 days of above normal temps caused the buds to swell way too early. What I really mean is that I lost the graft portion of these small trees,not the rootstock, so for me I didnt lose the tree in that I can regraft the tree in a year or so.

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#325 - 01/11/08 09:07 PM Re: Qing chestnut
lizak6 Offline
Member

Registered: 01/28/07
Posts: 9
Loc: huntington,n.y,usa
Ken
Thanks for the info.How tall are your 10 year old
qings?

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#326 - 01/13/08 02:44 PM Re: Qing chestnut
Davor Juretic Offline
Member

Registered: 05/14/07
Posts: 104
Loc: Croatia
I would like to have a Qing. I heard a lot about this cultivar but you cannot find it in Europe. If there is a kind soul that would be willing to send me a dozen of Qing nuts and scions I would nut graft them. Maybe I can find in my orchard something of your interest. Please write to my private address not to bother everybody with details.
_________________________
Davor Juretic

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#327 - 01/14/08 10:57 AM Re: Qing chestnut
Ken Hunt Offline
Member

Registered: 12/10/01
Posts: 59
Loc: Columbia, MO, Boone
The 10 year old Qing that produced 104 pounds of nuts has a trunk diameter of 7.6 inches at 42 inches off the ground. It has a full rounded crown with the first branches at least 4 feet off the ground. I am guessing at the height of the tree at around 20 feet or so. The understock was field planted in the fall of 1996 and the Qing scionwood was topworked in the spring of 1998. The tree is on a deep loess 'Menfro' soil (on the summit, not on a side slope, so not much topsoil has been lost to erosion) has a 6 foot wide strip where the grass is killed by Roundup herbicide 3 times a year, and has drip irrigation. The tree got 6 cups of ammonium nitrate in March and another 3 cups in July and a final cup right after nut harvest. The tree was actually overloaded with nuts and so the nut size on that tree was 10.5 grams from a random 100 nut sample.
The front page of this chestnut guide shows a picture the Qing tree in June 2006 on the first page. http://www.centerforagroforestry.org/pubs/chestnut.pdf

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#328 - 01/16/08 10:53 PM Re: Qing chestnut
lizak6 Offline
Member

Registered: 01/28/07
Posts: 9
Loc: huntington,n.y,usa
Thanks again Ken for all your info.
I'm planting a dozen Qing seedlings
in my yard this spring.Sort of a hobby
orchard.

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#329 - 01/16/08 11:03 PM Re: Qing chestnut
WhatcomChestnuts Offline
Member

Registered: 09/28/06
Posts: 12
Loc: Everson, WA USA
Ken,
Thanks for the application rate "6 cups of ammonium nitrate in March and another 3 cups in July and a final cup right after nut harvest". Here in WA state I can not purchase ammonium nitrate by its self. I have to purchase a mix. I purchase 50% ammonium nitrate and 50% urea. With this mix how would the same lbs/tree of N be achieved?

Once last question please. When is the best time to trim chestnut trees? All of my trees are european types.
_________________________
Bernie
Knowledge.. get all you can
then give it all away

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#330 - 01/17/08 02:58 PM Re: Qing chestnut
Carolyn Young Online   content
Member

Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 287
Loc: Ridgefield, WA USA
Would it be advisable to do a foliar analysis first to see what else might be needed?
_________________________
Carolyn Young
Allen Creek Farm

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#331 - 01/17/08 04:03 PM Re: Qing chestnut
Ken Hunt Offline
Member

Registered: 12/10/01
Posts: 59
Loc: Columbia, MO, Boone
The rate I gave was based on the age and size of the tree and was for around a 11 foot circle around the tree - I have been increasing the circle of fertilization each year and at some point will start fertlizing the whole area under the trees. We have a grass alleyway and that also effects things such as nutrients and water availablity. The more ferilizer put on the grass the more water is taken up by the grass. (I cheated a bit on the 11 foot "circle" and put most of the fertilzer on the round up strip and not so much on the live grass). I just got back my leaf analysis for Qing.
1.9% Nitrogen - should have 2.28%
0.12 Phos - should have 0.18
0.70 Potassium - should have 0.98
Calcium, Magnesium, Manganese, copper, Boron, Zinc were all in the "normal" range.
The normal averages were from surveys on the West Coast - so who's to say whats normal here in Missouri.
Basically, I cant give you much advice on how to fertilize your trees in your situation. But using 50-50 Amon nitrate and urea sounds good to me. Sending in tissue samples at the proper time of sampling sounds like something worthwhile like Carolyn states.

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#332 - 01/17/08 04:05 PM Re: Qing chestnut
Davor Juretic Offline
Member

Registered: 05/14/07
Posts: 104
Loc: Croatia
Quote:
The 10 year old Qing that produced 104 pounds of nuts has a trunk diameter of 7.6 inches at 42 inches off the ground. It has a full rounded crown with the first branches at least 4 feet off the ground. I am guessing at the height of the tree at around 20 feet or so. The understock was field planted in the fall of 1996 and the Qing scionwood was topworked in the spring of 1998. The tree is on a deep loess 'Menfro' soil (on the summit, not on a side slope, so not much topsoil has been lost to erosion) has a 6 foot wide strip where the grass is killed by Roundup herbicide 3 times a year, and has drip irrigation. The tree got 6 cups of ammonium nitrate in March and another 3 cups in July and a final cup right after nut harvest. The tree was actually overloaded with nuts and so the nut size on that tree was 10.5 grams from a random 100 nut sample.


Ken,100 pound per 10 year old tree sounds very impressive but 10.5 grams average nut size does not. That is because an average Croatian forest chestnut is about 10 grams. It would be a lot nicer to grow 'only' 50 pounds per tree of 20 gram nuts! Maybe we should learn something from apple growers. When they have too much fruit, early in the season they spay with hormones to achieve a desired drop off. I wonder if the technique would be applicable to chestnuts.
_________________________
Davor Juretic

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