The Chestnut Forum

Topic Options
#1386 - 01/11/17 10:47 PM Tree spacing
Tuffstonefarms Offline
Member

Registered: 01/10/17
Posts: 2
Loc: Oregon
Anyone have experience with older orchards planted on narrow spacing? 20 x 10 or narrower? Everyone seems to agree that trees need more room as they get older, but most other fruit or nut trees seem to be trending toward higher density.
_________________________
oregon grower

Top
#1387 - 01/12/17 11:09 AM Re: Tree spacing [Re: Tuffstonefarms]
Carolyn Young Offline
Member

Registered: 11/29/01
Posts: 304
Loc: Ridgefield, WA USA
We planted on 25' centers in '99. Looking back we would have gone with 30'. Production per tree would have increased and required pruning decreased.
_________________________
Carolyn Young
Allen Creek Farm

Top
#1405 - 05/20/17 09:40 AM Re: Tree spacing [Re: Tuffstonefarms]
Mike Nave Offline
Member

Registered: 10/06/05
Posts: 72
Loc: Elverta, CA, USA
Most fruit trees are workable with higher density. Chestnuts are usually not, because they are much more vigorous, unless you are growing selected varieties of Chinese nuts and intentionally keeping them dwarfish by yearly pruning. 20 x 10 would be a really bad idea if growing European trees in Oregon.
_________________________
Mike Nave

Top
#1407 - 05/24/17 12:47 AM Re: Tree spacing [Re: Tuffstonefarms]
Foster Offline
Member

Registered: 12/02/01
Posts: 53
Loc: Portland,OR. USA
Mike is absolutely correct. Growing chestnut in an orchard setting is not like most other tree crops. Its more like trying to tame the wild beast. Partly as chestnuts are typically grown on standard seedling rootstock rather than dwarfing clones (as with other tree crops), but also because most just want to be big trees. On many sites even with broad spacing, regular pruning to maintain large fruit size will also be necessary. That becomes more of a chore as the tree grows in height. In Oregon at 15 years, 40x40ft. spacing might be necessary to maximize production. That means if you start with a minimum of 20x20ft. (as I did over 20 years ago) you may need to remove 75% of your trees by year 15 or so, or massively prune and downsize them annually going forward. Choosing the best starting spacing in a given circumstance is not an easy or exact choice.

Top
#1408 - 05/24/17 01:23 AM Re: Tree spacing [Re: Tuffstonefarms]
Foster Offline
Member

Registered: 12/02/01
Posts: 53
Loc: Portland,OR. USA
I should add that tight spacing and a scenario of annual massive pruning can have downsides. Crowded trees and shading obviously diminish production and may promote disease. With many cultivars, hard pruning every year will favor shoot growth over fruit production. So... trying to to keep tight trees within limits of
spacing may lead to a vigorous new growth, but not much production.

Top



Copyright 2001-2017
C. A. Young, Battle Ground, WA