The Chestnut Forum

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#1052 - 02/24/04 05:29 PM How to integrate mushroom and pollen yields into chestnut orchard budget projections
Brian Cady Offline
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Registered: 03/17/02
Posts: 18
Loc: Beijing, China/Leverett, MA, U...
Rportedly the crop of mychorrhizal symbiotic boletes ripening below Italian chestnuts meets the chestnut crop's value some years, and, while wind-pollinated, chestnut's copious polen production is gathered by bees, with be pollen a farm product in its own right.
Shiitake has fruited when grown on chestnut trimmings.
Has anyone researched chestnut orchard's potential mushroom, shiitake, truffle and pollen yields, or integrated them into an enterprise budget?

Brian Cady
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#1053 - 06/15/07 04:33 PM Re: How to integrate mushroom and pollen yields into chestnut orchard budget projections
Davor Juretic Offline
Member

Registered: 05/14/07
Posts: 109
Loc: Croatia
Going through old post I stumbled also on this one. In France and Italy there are mushrooms in native chestnut forests. Some time ago I found an article saying that one should expect to have 100kg of boletus edilis per hectar, provided you know the trick. Not much but would be nice. Is it possible that nobody knows how to do this?

One can buy haselnuts plants with roots 'contaminated' with black truffles. I've never heard about boletus, though. Anybody?
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#1063 - 06/20/09 06:32 AM Re: How to integrate mushroom and pollen yields into chestnut orchard budget projections [Re: Davor Juretic]
Ros Offline
Member

Registered: 03/09/09
Posts: 1
Loc: Croatia
Hello

Having mychorrhizal symbiotic fungus on your chestnut roots surely is a way of improving it's growth. As the definition of symbiosis says, it's a relationship from which both organisms involved benefit. The tree suplies the fungus with carbohydrates, aminoacids ..., and the fungus gives mineral nutritients in exchange.
I've heard about a technique of "contaminating" oaks and other suitable species with truffle fungus. Since the propagation biology of the Boletus species is the same even though those are different classes of mushrooms, I am pretty sure the technique, which is very simple, could be applied to chestnut seedlings.

You take a truffle, and grate it. Put the grated material which contains spores into water (not too much water), and immerse the oak acorns into the fluid. After that, the acorns have to be placed in an "easy to germinate and develop" enviroinment.

The spores of the Boletus are produced in the mushroom cap, and it should be easy to grate a dried mushroom.

The process takes time, but I would be happy if anyone reports it to be successful. Of course, a little problem might be the use fungicides in modern chestnut orchards.

cheers
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Ros

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#1204 - 01/18/12 01:07 PM Re: How to integrate mushroom and pollen yields into chestnut orchard budget projections [Re: Ros]
Joe Kersey Offline
Member

Registered: 05/18/08
Posts: 15
Loc: Reddick, Florida, USA
Mushrooms growing in the soil close to your chestnut trees are a indication of organic matter in the soil. I believe organic matter is good for the trees.
Question:What do you do with the leaves, burrs, etc. from the chestnut trees? I believe they should be incorporated back into the soil.
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#1207 - 01/26/12 03:07 PM Re: How to integrate mushroom and pollen yields into chestnut orchard budget projections [Re: Joe Kersey]
zelko Offline
Member

Registered: 01/24/12
Posts: 3
Loc: Canada
Sweep leaves and burrs in a circle to the drip line and leave it
there, if you do not have to many trees.
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