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#1065 - 07/02/09 12:42 PM cloning chestnut trees
carlos mateus Offline
Member

Registered: 04/27/06
Posts: 3
Loc: Lisbon, Portugal
i´ve tried already two times to clone a chestnut tree using a technique i´ve got to know in 2001; a dormant scion (cut in mid winter and store in a refrigerator) is grafted into a rootstock starting to brek bud; supposedly the root will send energy to the scion and issue a "wake-up call"; then we will get a grafted tree, after some time.
Well, all of my trials failed and i tried for the last two years; used different chestnut fruit and scion from the same tree, fom diferent trees, etc; on most trials the rooting starts ok, but the scion never wakes up. Took all cares when grafting and afterwards with temperature, humidity (never too much water) and light conditions.
Does anybody have a clue for the reason of all of my failures?
All of my experiments used portuguese chestnut qualities "Martainha" and "Longal" and the scions were cut from chesnut tree variaty "Martainha".

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#1067 - 07/08/09 04:10 PM Re: cloning chestnut trees [Re: carlos mateus]
Dr. Sandy Offline
Member

Registered: 06/08/09
Posts: 13
Loc: New Haven, CT, USA
It is very difficult to graft onto a rootstock that is just breaking bud, as the sap is "rising" and the connection is hard to make. I have been told to wait until the rootstock leaves were out before using it. I believe that many people wait until early June.
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Sandy

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#1069 - 07/13/09 06:32 AM Re: cloning chestnut trees [Re: Dr. Sandy]
carlos mateus Offline
Member

Registered: 04/27/06
Posts: 3
Loc: Lisbon, Portugal
What I mean is nut-grafting. I saw this article on the internet writen by Carl Mayfield:
»The term “nut-grafting” is applied to a means of grafting scion wood from a chestnut tree directly into a chestnut. The resulting product will replicate the tree from which the scion wood is taken. The resulting root system is provided by the chestnut seed to which the scion wood is grafted.«
I tried for 3 years now and i could not get any good results.
Perhaps there is someone that could have any ideas regarding this subject and maybe i can find the reason or reasons for my unsuccessful trials.
Thanks anyway for your reply.

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#1073 - 08/04/09 04:20 PM Re: cloning chestnut trees [Re: carlos mateus]
Davor Juretic Offline
Member

Registered: 05/14/07
Posts: 110
Loc: Croatia
Nutgrafting has been discussed on this forum earlier. I followed instructions I found on internet, maybe the same that you were reading. I had success only with scions that had swollen buds. Therefore you should not cut them in the middle of winter but when they start swelling in spring and keep them till the moment nuts start to sprout. Then you cut the sprout away and insert the scion.
Your problem may be the compatibility, though. Normally you should graft on the scion's seedling, unless you have a special reason not to.
Nutgrafting is tedious. At least the way I did it. It requires frequent checking if the nuts sprouted, meaning searching for them in peat moss. That is why I switched to for regular grafting.
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Davor Juretic

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#1075 - 08/08/09 12:57 AM Re: cloning chestnut trees [Re: carlos mateus]
Mike Nave Offline
Member

Registered: 10/06/05
Posts: 72
Loc: Elverta, CA, USA
I haven't found nut grafting to be too difficult even when the stock and the nut are quite different. The only secret I know is to keep the grafted nut very humid. Don't let it dry out.

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#1094 - 02/15/10 06:39 PM Re: cloning chestnut trees [Re: Mike Nave]
jocelyn Offline
Member

Registered: 12/22/05
Posts: 42
Loc: mt stewart, PEI, Canada
Carlos, don't give up. I did some in 2008, they started to swell their buds, then I let them get too dry and the nuts cracked and pulled away from the scions. All died. I did some more, and kept them too wet, all died, went mouldy.

This year, I did 11, and so far, 4 have leafed and only one went mouldy. I used 1 l of water in 4 and a half litres of dry milled peat. I used hot water, because it mixes easier. After the wet peat cooled, I put about 2 cups in each 2 litre freezer bag, then labeled the bag as to scion and nut. I'm in Canada and it's cold here, so I made the grafts as the directions on the net said, then put one graft in each bag and set them on top of the hot water tank in the bathroom..the warmest room in the house. I tied the bags shut and also punched a bunch of small holes in each bag for air. In 2 or 3 weeks, the buds started to swell, and this was where I lost them the year before. I didn't want to lose them by potting them in peat pots, so I just hung the bags from curtain hooks on a string in a west window. 4 have leaves so far, and one of the 11 has gone mouldy. I don't think it really matters when you take the scions, they seem to keep in the fridge for many months. I took mine about 3 weeks after the leaves fell, in mid November, and put them in two layers of plastic bags in the fridge with a few drops of water on a paper towel, so they would stay slightly damp. The nuts napped in the fridge till the end of December, which gave them at least 60 days cold. The scions were starting to swell their buds in the fridge by Jan 4th, so I then put the nuts on top of the hot water tank too, to hurry them along. AS each nut sprouted, I made the graft, so they have been done over Jan 7th to Feb 1st. It doesn't matter, if each graft is in its own bag. Sometimes you let them get too wet, you think they are dry and water them too much. These may get mould on the leaf scars and it may creep up to the bud. Don't panic, just mix up a one in four dilution of bleach and take a soft brush and clean each mouldy one with the bleach. No need to rinse. Any green on the bud scale will turn brown after bleaching. This is OK, as the bud will still grow. I would also like to thank who ever mentioned Dr Serdar as a good guy to coach on nut grafting. He did e-mil me back with directions, warmth being the main thing, and this year is better. I did write back the dear Dr and update him, and thank him. So, Carlos, try again, it will get better each time. Something else you might try, if you can get parafilm tape or laboratory film, is called "inverted radicle grafting". Search on this, plus Dr Serdar's name, and there is a good paper he wrote, with pictures. It has a slightly better success rate than nut grafting. I did 9 of those Jan 26 to Feb 1, and only one has not started to swell its buds yet. if you can't get parafilm, tying the graft with rafia and then coating with handwax might do.(grafting wax) You could try carpenters' glue too, if wax is not available.
_________________________
Jocelyn Clarke, Canada
woodlot owner, retired

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